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The government and the state?

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Rawaz_S
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Now I do not know if this topic should be in this particular forum, but this is also due to that I do not know if there is a word for the subject.

We Kurds tend to use the Arabic word for government, Hikumet, and state interchangeably. This is perhaps not surprising when the government has actually been the state in the autocratic systems the Kurds have lived in. One needs only to think of the famous expression of Louis XIV: "L'etat, c'est moi".
But I think it is about time we separate these two words from each other. I believe this separation of the words is also a mental separation, or the idea that government is not the same as the state. This is ideological change is needed before we can make the practical change possible. In Europe for example you do not call the police a tool of the government, but rather a tool of the state. In Kurdistan people say "the government have not done this or that" but rather it is the state that should be doing the "this and that".

My question is: Is there a word in Kurdish for government and state respectively, I have heard that mírí means government but this should rather be principality(?). Yet hikumet is the only word used today, and for the state most people say dewllet.

DRoshani
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Some definitions are needed here

When we have these new concepts we need to explain what they mean so we can sense the fine line between them. You are right that in Kurdish there is no attempt to separate one from the the other.

As for definitions one can say that a state is an entity that occupies a definite geographic area, has a certain culture, people, language history and the like. The term state is used to distinguish a certain territory from another one based on these factors. It is an independent and sovereign entity that can be distinguished from the other states and has certain administrative tasks to be carried out for its proper functioning. These administrative tasks are carried out by the government. This entity has the right to exercise power over the territory and the people. State is the territory in which the government can practice its authority. A state is like an organization and the government is like the management team.

In Kurdish we use the word "Herém" for Sate, "Komar" for government and "Mallwend" for country (Arabic wullat/welat, and now Persian "Kishwer" is used more) whether these are used wisely to make them more common is the question of our time on how media is regulated in Kurdistan. I do not think that any Kurdish media out puts are edited for quality purposes these days.

§-------------------------------------------
- Alfabéygí Yekgirig/Yekgirtú careseri bineyíg erra girifteyli zuwani Kurdí ye!
- "We must become the change we want to see" [quote: Mahatma Gandhi]

Rawaz_S
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Further definitions

I do not agree with your definition of the state, a state does not need to have a "a certain culture, people, language history and the like". This would rather be the nation, there is a merge of the state and the nation in the nation state. But the state does not need these traits as this would be an anachronistic view of the state, for example it would exclude many post-modern state and more importantly it would also rule out many pre-French revolution states. If we were to accept this definition the Hapsburg Empire would not be considered a state as it contained numerous cultures, peoples languages and histories. In fact the administrative language was not even German or Magyar but rather Latin which was only later changed to German with the rise of nationalism.

The state is not easily defined but some general conceptions is that "A state is a set of institutions that possess the authority to make the rules that govern the people in one or more societies, having internal and external sovereignty over a definite territory" it also has monopoly on legitimate physical force (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_%28polity%29).
The Government on the other hand is directing the state, in some forms of government more than others. But if we talk about a modern liberal democracy as we see in the west, the government directs the state but the state is also always to some extent independent of it. The government can implement its policies to steer the state on one or the other direction. In my opinion administrative tasks are carried out by the state, but its policies is decided partly by the government, but mainly by the parliament (in a parliamentarian system).

I am not sure, but does not Herém rather stand for province? We say "herémí Kurdistan", but I have never heard "herémí Swíd (Swéd)".
As for government, isn't Komar rather republic? We say Komarí Mahabad, Komarí Islamí Éran, but do we say Komarí Swíd? Or Komarí Brítaníya? I have never heard it as these are monarchies and not republics.

DRoshani
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Your argument is just!

The word Sate, has the same root as Swedish Stan, Persian Ostan, and Kurdish Sitan. When you say United State of America we mean a unity between souvenir areas with defined boundaries. In Swedish you have Län and Staten. I am sure there many new political concept related to State and its function in political language but these are new concepts and therefore is hard to use it to explain the political structure of 17 century. Again there two different concepts of what State stand for in American and British English.

I think the word Komar stand for Arabic word "Dewlet" (government), but there is question mark here that the words such as Komellga, Komelle, Komkojhí, Komar, Komkar, are all have a same element as the Latin Prefix Com- which means joint, together, United. In all Kurdish cases it refer to people. Is the word Komar refer to people's power?

§-------------------------------------------
- Alfabéygí Yekgirig/Yekgirtú careseri bineyíg erra girifteyli zuwani Kurdí ye!
- "We must become the change we want to see" [quote: Mahatma Gandhi]